So Long, Baylight, and Thanks for All the Blessings

Last Sunday was the farewell party for Baylight Church Community, a place I considered my spiritual home for a good chunk of my adult years. For something that existed for about 11 years, it ended with some good food and old friends. In a way, it was fitting, but in another way, I think I’m still . . . → Read More: So Long, Baylight, and Thanks for All the Blessings

Can a Health Care Reform Approach Inform Church Reform?

I recently participated in a fascinating workshop on Improvement Science that addressed how change happens in a context of systems (used originally in health care and now being applied to education). One of the most thought-provoking assertions for me came in the form of a quote from Paul Batalden:

“Every system is perfectly designed to achieve exactly . . . → Read More: Can a Health Care Reform Approach Inform Church Reform?

More Isn’t Always Better…in the Church

I started this week with a post talking about why More Megapixels Aren’t Always Better (is that title even grammatically correct?) for two primary reasons:

I have a problem with consumerism marketing which pushes new products on people even if the new product won’t actually provide a noticeable improvement.
I think there are lessons in this for the . . . → Read More: More Isn’t Always Better…in the Church

More Megapixels Aren’t Always Better

If you’ve tracked digital photography over the last ten years, you’ll have likely noticed that the largest font in any digital camera ad or brochure is always the number of megapixels. I still remember ten years ago traveling around the world with two cameras–a tiny Olympus Stylus Zoom 70 film camera and a Canon PowerShot A50 . . . → Read More: More Megapixels Aren’t Always Better

Treating People Like People

I went to the lumber yard recently to pick up some wood in my attempt to build patio furniture, and I had a fascinating experience–they treated me just like any other customer. Now you have to imagine me in a big, industrial lumber yard in khakis and a hooded sweatshirt, looking like anything but a craftsman, . . . → Read More: Treating People Like People