Being Green Isn’t Just Trendy, It’s Social Justice

Everything is trying to be green these days. Visit any product website, take a stroll down the aisle at your local store, or glance at an ad, and chances are, there are a bunch of things touted as environmentally friendly. Especially in San Francisco, there’s a lot of movement to reduce consumption, understand your carbon footprint, . . . → Read More: Being Green Isn’t Just Trendy, It’s Social Justice

Seeing the World as a Gift

A great paragraph drawing on insights from the Eastern Orthodox tradition on seeing creation as a gift, not as something at our disposal:

The doctrine of creation, then, means that our created environment is touched by the hand of God, is a place where we can encounter God, and still in some way bears the traces of . . . → Read More: Seeing the World as a Gift

Survey Results: Values versus Incentives

Last week, I wrote a post “Which is the Better Motivator – Values or Incentives?”, and invited folks to participate in a quick survey. In it, participants had to choose one or the other–values or incentives–as the better motivator for action with regards to “environmental issues.” A number of you weighed in via Facebook, Google+, and . . . → Read More: Survey Results: Values versus Incentives

Which is the Better Motivator – Values or Incentives?

What motivates you more? Is it values (“It’s the right thing to do”) or is it incentives (“This helps me in some way, so I’ll do it”)? Recently I’ve been reading a bunch on environmental ethics. One of the interesting things I’ve noticed is that there is a lot of research and data out there demonstrating . . . → Read More: Which is the Better Motivator – Values or Incentives?

Did the Market Economy and Modern Science Lead to Some of Today’s Ecological Issues?

In my reading, I’ve been encountering some challenging suggestions by Michael Northcott from his book The Environment and Christian Ethics. First, he contends that the development of a market economy, a system that basically made everything “ownable” (i.e. land, buildings, labor, time, etc.) has led to a disregard for the value of non-human objects like rivers, . . . → Read More: Did the Market Economy and Modern Science Lead to Some of Today’s Ecological Issues?